Geiranger

Yours Fjords

Listen to the sound of the glacier. Savour the smell of a waterfall. FjordNorway is not a place. It’s a feeling. Your feeling. One that you won’t really believe until you’ve experienced it.

FjordNorway is not merely a place. It’s an experience. The sound of the blue glacier. That view that suddenly appears at a bend in the road. The smell of a waterfall. The silence of a beach in the morning. The evening
sun reflected off the green fjord. A million moments. Your moments. Moments you won’t believe until you’ve experienced them.

You don’t travel to the attractions in FjordNorway. You travel through them. There is not one phase of this journey. Whether along the roads, by train or on the fjords, it is the journey which is in itself the experience.
The ever-changing landscape – the mountains, glaciers, fjords and waterfalls – has attracted guests from around the world for centuries. And though you will inevitably catch yourself marvelling at the highlights, it is the
totality which is the attraction. Nature’s dimensions somehow play with one’s perspective. The magnificent mountainsides remind us of how small we are. The beauty in the finer details. Out of the blue, surprises
remind us of the richness of life.

The fjords are not as much a place in Norway as they are a place in the world. Geirangerfjord and Nærøyfjord received UNESCO World Heritage status as a cultural landscape. National Geographic has called the fjords the world’s most well-preserved World Heritage site. But why? Because FjordNorway is not a scenic backdrop, but a community. A living landscape where humans and nature live in mutual dependence.

And still, roads manage to meander their way through all of this. Around every turn, a new view, alternating continuously between high mountains and fertile lowlands and where small villages live life to the fullest,
yet with such simple means. 9 of the 18 national tourist routes are found here. Scenic routes where landscape interacts with modern architecture. A road which winds its way through contrasts and surprises. Societies that
co-exist with the landscape. The deep fjords. The high mountains. The jagged coastline. A landscape tailor-made for exploration. Not just a place. An experience. Your experience.

The Fjord Cities
In FjordNorway, nature is part of the cities, and the cities are part of nature. Large, yet small communities with the fjords and coast right on their doorstep.

The cities in FjordNorway reflect the personality of the people who live there. They are shaped by the landscape, surrounded by the ocean, cultural landscape and  mountains. As a visitor, you will see
that the past and modern city life go hand in hand. A long seafaring, fishing and trading history has made its mark on the cities, but they are also characterized by modern technology and forward-looking industries. Their rich cultural life is inspired by local traditions and impulses from the outside world. There are many other towns in FjordNorway that offer fantastic experiences. Kristiansund, Molde, Florø and
Haugesund are just a few examples of towns that each have their own distinctive charm. But hospitality, a rich history and exciting experiences are common denominators for all of them – and nature is right on
their doorstep.

Bergen
Bergen is the gateway to the fjords. Its location between the Hardangerfjord and the Sognefjord makes this long-established cultural and trading city the perfect starting point for day trips to some of the biggest scenic attractions in the region. There is plenty to do in Bergen. The old Hanseatic wharf at Bryggen, situated beside the city’s lively Fish Market, is on UNESCO’s World Heritage List. The city has a rich cultural scene and there are lots of exciting activities for children in the compact, pedestrian-friendly city centre. You can easily get to the top of two of the seven mountains that surround the city centre by cable car or funicular. You can enjoy the fantastic views, or go for a walk in the mountains and end the day by enjoying a meal made from local produce at one of the city’s excellent restaurants.

Stavanger
Stavanger is surrounded by a green, fertile coastal landscape that is only a short distance from the dramatic scenery of the Lysefjord. Some of the region’s top restaurants, which are known for their
creative use of local produce, are found in this area. Old wooden houses and charming shopping streets form the very heart of this modern, cosmopolitan city. Stavanger is a great starting point
for day trips to the Lysefjord and spectacular hikes to viewpoints such as Preikestolen (Pulpit Rock) and Mount Kjerag. Families with children might like to visit Kongeparken amusement park, the biggest amusement park in FjordNorway.
There are interesting museums where you can learn about everything from Viking history to modern oil production. Just outside the city, you will find lovely, long beaches with fantastic surfing conditions.

Ålesund
Ålesund lies in a spectacular location on narrow islands, where the fjords of Sunnmøre meet the sea. The city has a long, interesting history, and it is known for the distinctive Art
Nouveau architecture of the city centre, which was rebuilt after it was ravaged by fire in 1904.
Its location makes it a unique starting point for a multitude of activities and experiences. From the city centre, it only takes an hour to experience everything from the ocean, unique island communities and beautiful fjords lined by sheer mountainsides plunging into the sea. Ålesund is also a fantastic starting point for exploring the peaks of the Sunnmøre Alps.


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